Layers Lockdown

Dear Diary,

I have a confession to make: I’m in love with layers.

I remember my very first diary. It had teddy bears on the cover accompanied with the words “Bear Song.” In it I bared my soul. Pages and pages riddled with my cutesy juvenile penmanship declaring my schoolgirl crushes, bemoaning the trials and tribulations of friendships, worrying about good grades and other #13yearoldproblems. To prevent prying eyes from stumbling upon my innermost thoughts and feelings, my diary was secured by a lock. I wore the key around my neck and close to my heart for safekeeping.

It is silly to believe that flimsy little lock could really keep my secrets secure. If anyone wanted to break into my diary, a hairpin or strong yank on the lock would do it. While I no longer have use for a diary, I have discovered an alternate use for that lock. I found these diary locks for dirt-cheap by the handful, and re-purposed them into something wearable. 1 chain + 1 skeleton key + multiple locks = 1 fabulous innuendo laden necklace. A statement piece for sure, it makes a great addition to my layered autumn outfit.

Multiple layers begs the question, how to mix and match? The answer is to stay awash with neutrals of navy, grey, tan, and taupe – a color palette that is perfect for the season.

My dad’s wool cardigan vest coupled with my cotton knit cardigan provided just the right amount of warmth I needed with minimal bulk. I recently wore this outfit to brunch on a cool overcast morning. By the afternoon, the sun had broken through the clouds, and my body temperature was 98 degrees and rising. Luckily, all I had to do was peel back my layers like an onion to keep my cool.

It is safe to say I’ve got this layered look on lockdown. But with so many locks and just one ill-fitting skeleton key, what should I do?

Wait, I have an idea. Call a locksmith!


vintage sweater vest (similar) / BDG cardigan (similar) / BDG moto jeans (similar) / Alternative tee (similar) / Hinge oxfords / vintage necklace (similar)

Autumn Layers

Charlie Girl

The bowler hat. The frumpy suit. That mustache. I’m talking about none other than The Tramp himself, Charlie Chaplin.

charlie

As a child, Chaplin and his mother people watched together and she would imitate the passers-by as a way to entertain him. From her he learned how to express emotions using his hands and face with utmost precision. Through his observations of people, he developed a keen sense of how to read his audience so that he could react to their reactions. It is no wonder that Chaplin was a master of his craft, and he is certainly regarded as one of the greatest entertainers of all time.

I consider myself a fairly funny gal amongst friends and family, and my small desire to be a performer led me to dabble in a few improv classes. However, in a room full of strangers, I found my normally silly self wanting to hide in the corner of the room. Allowing myself to be an inanimate object, make non-sensical sounds, pantomime, and be uninhibited in goofiness was more than I expected and far more difficult than I imagined. Charlie had me fooled – being funny definitely requires technique and practice. Perhaps I shouldn’t quit my day job just yet and stick to what I do best.

This shirt hit my funny bone the moment I picked it off the rack at a vintage shop during my summer trip to Portland. Sometimes I enjoy me a loose fitting boyish shirt, and this retro bowling blouse did just that. Flowers for me? Oh Charlie, you shouldn’t have! This shirt also has an unexpected surprise, but you have to wait for my exit. When I turn my back, there Charlie is, in all his bumbling glory. I prefer myself sans mustache, but I managed to channel Charlie’s look with a mini hat and umbrella cane.

Maybe it was the shirt or the balloons, but things got goofy real fast during this photoshoot. Silence isn’t my strongest suit since I usually talk the talkie, but this was my attempt at putting my improv skills to the test.

Tramp around in heels I often do, yet tramp I certainly am not!


vintage blouse (similar blouse) / Urban Outfitters jeans (similar jeans) / thrifted oxfords (similar oxfords) / mini hat fascinator (similar fascinator)

Puttin’ in Pleats

I’m a good sport about putting balls into holes. Any stroke will do it, right?

From the conservative dress of the 1800s, to the short hemlines of the 1960s, women’s fashion in sports reflected societal norms of dress of the time. As more women participated in sports, there grew a demand for practicality and functionality for they needed the same ease of movement as men. Restrictive forms of clothing gave way to the sportier and shorter silhouettes seen today.

I recently had the opportunity to try my hand at golf for the very first time. Interestingly, golf began as a social club for young men and women to meet each other. Thus, it was important for women to be dressed to impress should they encounter a suitor. For them, golfing was more about the fashion than the sport itself – they were dressed to a (golf) tee.

Nowadays, golfing is purely focused on the sport, but that did not deter me from looking my best on the fairway. Excited to get my Tiger Woods on (in the pro-golf sense), I seized this opportunity as an excuse to wear my tennis dress.

Daiso hat (similar hat) / vintage tennis dress (similar dress) / thrifted shoes (similar shoes)

Yes, I said tennis dress. But the sport is golf, no? While the sports are different, they do share some commonalities in their fashion evolution whether it be long sleeved blouses, rising hemlines, or sweater cardigans. I feel this dress could probably work in the game of golf. The little drop waist pleats must’ve been made for this game as one has to stick their butt out quite a bit just to putt the ball. Pass me the wood please!

Unfortunately, I didn’t meet any potential suitors on the fairway and failed to make a hole in one. Where’s a caddy when you need one? I guess I need to step up my game or just stick to driving the golf cart. Fore!

The Mystery in the Woods

I spy something in the woods.

In grade school, the Nancy Drew series was one of my favorites to read. In each mystery case, Nancy, along with her gal pals Bess and George took sleuthing to a whole new level. Like the bookworm that I once was, my weekends were spent at the library reading the books from cover to cover.


While Nancy Drew has undergone constant transformations from its inception in the 1930s to present day, it is the probably the series written from the 1960s and 1970s that I identify with most. Perhaps at age ten, I was unconsciously attracted to the vintage fashions donned by Nancy and her gal pals who graced the book covers. Not only were they beautifully illustrated, but also Miss Drew’s hair was always perfectly coiffed and her outfits were to die for.

I put on my figurative sleuthing hat in the form of a plaid Sherlock Holmes-ish trench shirtdress. Nothing says detective and drama like a big oversized cape. This lovely one from the 1960s is a bit long for my petite frame – but it is perfect for covering up bare legs when wearing a short dress underneath. The best part about this cape is the matching scarf complete with a little fringe. This is surely is an outfit that Nancy Drew would have problem solving – sometimes my styling skills remain a mystery even to me.

A detective wouldn’t be a detective without some sort of eye-seeing gadget. This vintage brass binocular is perfect for sleuthing, the opera, bird watching, or for my favorite pastime: people watching, especially of the male species. Not to mention it is so heavy that it can double as a weapon, should I be put in harm’s way.

Mystery in the wood? That’s what he said.


H&M beanie (similar) / vintage cape (similar) / thrifted dress (similar) / We Who See shoes (similar) / vintage binocular (similar)