Amour Vert

There’s something about the Parisian chic style that has a certain je ne sais quoi. And in a world where trends move quickly and fast fashion rules, there’s Amour Vert.

Fashion Amour Vert

Amour Vert is the brainchild of husband and wife team Christoph Frehsee and Linda Balti. This eco-conscious brand has a simple concept: you buy a tee and they plant a tree. With a focus on sustainability, they strive to reduce waste while still producing high-quality items.

A color palette of neutrals, solids, and stripes done in a blend of feminine blouses, flowy dresses, and of course, their signature oh-so-soft drapey knits in Tencel, Modal, and cotton, epitomize the Amour Vert aesthetic. While there are a few seasonal styles and colors, for the most part, basics are the core of their collection. Just like the Parisian chic style, they designed these classic seasonless pieces for people to keep for a long time.

While their designs have that European flair, their materials and production take place locally in San Francisco and Oakland. With brick and mortar locations popping up throughout the Bay Area, Frehsee and Balti are taking the fashion world by eco-conscious storm.

Daiso hat (similar) | Amour Vert tee | Urban Outfitters shorts (similar) | White Mountain espadrilles (similar) | vintage Dooney & Bourke (similar) | vintage belt (similar) | compass necklace (similar)

ootd fashion style

Labor Day marks the unofficial end of summer as well as any white wearing business, so I decided to take my Amour Vert tee out for a nautical spin, from front to back.

A deep V + super soft material = a versatile striped basic worn two ways. Whether it’s a figure-elongating, décolletage revealing effect I’m after or an unexpected exposed sexy back, we can all agree that eco-conscious fashion is always chic no matter how you wear it. C’est bon!

ootd fashion style

ootd fashion style

Daiso hat (similar) | Amour Vert tee | Urban Outfitters shorts (similar) | White Mountain espadrilles (similar) | vintage Dooney & Bourke (similar) | vintage belt (similar) | compass necklace (similar)

ootd fashion style

Set Sail


My mom has a wealth of experience and is a self taught pattern maker. She scours over vintage sewing books passed onto her from older friends. The books, nearly falling apart, are riddled with her notes written in pencil, pages are doggy eared, and in between some chapters I find her quarter scale sample patterns cut from newspapers – all techniques she uses to master her craft and know it by heart.

I can never decipher her cryptic notes and sometimes her verbal explanations get lost in translation. I wanted to learn the fundamentals and principles of sewing so that I could gain a closer bond with my mom through this shared love of the sewing machine and the craftiness that can be created with it.

So it was several fall semesters ago that I finally discovered and enrolled in my first sewing class at a community college. I had an advantage over some of my classmates who had never touched a sewing machine before (forget personal sewing machines – my mom has the real deal industrial Brother), yet there were still many gaps in my sewing knowledge that I needed to fill.


Daiso hat (similar) / sail shirt (similar) / Silence & Noise sailor pants (similar) / Urban Outfitters sunglasses (similar) / pendant necklace (similar) / vintage wooden cuff (similar) / vintage purse (similar) / J. Crew cardigan (similar) / J. Crew pumps (similar)

Over the years, I learned that the act of sewing itself is only a small part of the equation – and maybe not even the most important one. Operating a sewing machine in and of itself isn’t difficult per se, but the manipulation of different fabrics can be challenging. Unusual seam lines that require contorting the fabric in an unnatural way under the needle is enough to want to call it quits on a project. Order of construction and pressing the garment prove to be equally important, and drafting a pattern can be time consuming for the novice. But with enough practice and patience, I’ll be able to whip up a couture gown in no time.

This shirt is a reminder of how I set sail on my sewing education many semesters ago, using left over scrap fabric from a previous project I made with my mom. Drafted in the beginners class from a general block, I proudly wear this shirt even though it’s a bit ill fitting. It’s a reminder of how far I’ve come (which isn’t that far at all), but even more so, it’s the French seams I put all over the place that deters me from altering it to fit me better.

The sailboats, bright pops of yellow and orange against a backdrop of sky blue always puts a smile to my face whenever I wear it, as if the shirt’s sunny disposition has the power to cast away any cloudy days or shadow of doubt I have over my sewing capabilities. The outfit wouldn’t be complete without extra splashes of yellow, and I found a spot for a little dandelion flower in the little pocket on my sleeve, sewn by yours truly.

Now that I am wiser and more experienced with garment construction, perhaps it’s time to set sail on a better fitting project.